Closer to Home: Lanikai Pillboxes Hike

Summer’s here! The blog has been quiet as of late, but with school and the kids’ extracurriculars finally behind us, we’ve been focused on prepping for our Glacier/North Cascades/Olympic trip (we leave in three weeks!). Maps are being compiled; lists are being checked twice. With the bulk of our itinerary leaning toward backpacking this year, it’s also crunch time for conditioning. This weekend’s fun and easy training hike was Lanikai Pillboxes.

Lanikai is renowned for its beautiful beaches.

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Sunrise, Lanikai Beach 2013

Media outlets like CNN have named it the most beautiful beach in the US, and though I haven’t traveled enough to say for sure, I can certainly vouch for Lanikai’s beauty. Located on the eastern side of Oahu, Lanikai’s fine powdery sand and pristine turquoise waters make it one of the best sunrise spots on the island. But Lankai has another great attraction that I love as much or even more than the beach: the Lanikai Pillboxes hike, a.k.a. Kaiwa Ridge Trail.

This 1.6 mile out and back hike begins across the Mid Pacific Country Club near a private driveway on Kaelepulu Drive.

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Beginning of the trail, Lanikai Pillboxes

The trail begins with a steep incline; there are trees and ropes along the chain link fence to assist with the climb, though they’re probably not necessary for most. Sadly, litter and pet waste makes this area less than appealing, but not to worry–better sights and smells await.

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Hold your nose and climb fast, Lanikai Pillboxes
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The beginning of the trail is a little steep, Lanikai Pillboxes

After a short climb, you arrive at a plateau that overlooks Lanikai Beach and the Mokulua Islands just offshore. Behind you are sweeping views of Mokapu Peninsula (Marine Corps Base of Hawaii), Flat Island, and Kailua Beach.

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Lanikai Beach and Mokulua Islands
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MCBH, Flat Island, Kailua Beach

From here, you can visualize the first pillbox in the distance and the rocky trail that follows the ridgeline to get you there. The trail gains over 550 feet in under half a mile, but the short distance makes the steepness doable for families with young children. With a little persistence, it’s possible to make it to the first pillbox in 20 minutes, and there are many places to stop and catch your breath along the way.

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The 1st pillbox is that black speck at the top/center of the photo
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Looking back

The trail diverges in several spots–traversing the top of the ridge and contouring it in other areas–but rest assured that all spur trails lead to the same destination.

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Follow the ridgeline to get to the first pillbox (far left)

 

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Along the ridge, overlooking MCBH

Once you arrive at the first bunker, take a moment to admire the view. We were there just before sunset, and there were several groups situated atop and inside the pillboxes, waiting for the sun to go down.

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View from the first pillbox, Lanikai

Early morning hikers often find themselves vying for space here as it’s a popular spot for sunrise photography as well. As documented in my Bryce horseback debacle, I’m not keen on heights and ledges, so I opted to stay firmly on the trail here. 🙂 The boys, however, climbed atop the pillbox with my husband.

 

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The first pillbox. The boys climbed up here and made mom verrrry nervous.
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View from the ground, first pillbox, Kaiwa Ridge Trail

Many hikers opt to turn around here, but a short 5 minute walk further up the ridge takes you to the second pillbox–and a breathtaking view of the Ko’olau Mountain Range in all its verdant, crenulated glory.

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View of the Ko’olaus and Mokulua Islands (photo credit to the hubby)
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View from the second pillbox, Lanikai
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Lanikai neighborhood as seen from Kaiwa Ridge Trail

From here, you can follow the undulating ridge for another 20-30 minute; the trail eventually descends into a neighborhood about a half mile from the trailhead, but we opted to retrace our steps instead. The sun was just beginning to set, and we were treated to cool tradewinds and an entire hillside of night-blooming cereus readying for evening bloom. Night-blooming cereus is a tropical cactus flower that blooms in the evening and wilts by dawn.

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Night-blooming cereus, Lanikai Pillboxes (photo cred to the hubby)

All in all, this short and sweet hike is one that I would highly recommend. It packs mega scenery for minimal sweat, showcasing stunning Windward views of the island. Tell me: have you hiked Lanikai Pillboxes? What’s your favorite Hawaii sunrise or sunset spot?

Tips for families hiking Lanikai Pillboxes with young children:

Plan to hike on weekdays, if possible

The trail can get crowded, especially on the weekends.  We finished the trail fairly late (6:30 pm), and there were still large groups of ten or more arriving to hike as we left. Weekdays are less busy and tend to be more pleasant.

Use the bathroom beforehand

There are no bathrooms at the trailhead, so plan accordingly. The nearest public restroon is located at Kailua Beach Park, 5 minutes away.

No parking near the trailhead

No parallel parking is allowed alongside the Mid Pacific Country Club. Your best bet is to park in the surrounding neighborhood, but be advised that parking can be difficult to find because of the new restriction against parking in the bicycle lane. Resist the temptation to park illegally–parking in a restricted area will result in an outrageous $200 flat fine! Instead, circle the Lanikai loop patiently–you’re sure to find something quickly, as visitors are always arriving and departing from the beach.

Apply sunscreen and avoid hiking midday

The Hawaii sun can be brutal if you’re not properly prepared, especially on an exposed ridge hike like this one. Good sun safety makes for a pleasant and comfortable hike.

Wear proper hiking shoes

Many tourists attempt this hike in flip flops and sandals. I’m sure it can be done, but as the trail is mostly slippery rock and gravel, shoes with proper traction are key.

Avoid hiking during or after rain

Again, the trail is steep and challenging in certain areas. Mud and wet rock only exacerbates these difficulties and makes for a sketchy hike. We saw two adults slip and fall this weekend, and the trail was bone dry. Keep little ones safe, and be sure to limit hiking to good weather.

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Sunset, Lanikai Pillboxes last year
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Sunset, Kaiwa Ridge trail

 

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9 thoughts on “Closer to Home: Lanikai Pillboxes Hike”

  1. Yay, another Hawaii post! I’m not very familiar with Oahu, only been there once as a kid in the touristy area. Never would have guessed there to be a hike like this with such gorgeous sweeping views. My kind of hike! Wow, thank you so much for letting us know about this. As always I appreciate all your tips. Let’s see, favorite sunset spot in Hawaii would be anywhere on the west shore of the Big Island with a Mai Tai in my hand. Hawaii is just so beautiful!
    You and your family must be having so much fun getting ready for the big trip, so excited for your guys!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Aww, thanks so much, Aya! Have to agree with you–Kona can’t be beat when it comes to sunsets. Even better with a Mai Tai in hand–yess! (Have you tried a Lava Flow? So tropical and yummy.) If you ever come to Oahu, the Lanikai hike is a nice one to do. Crowded, which is kind of a bummer, but really pretty view. And we’re definitely super excited about the trip! Getting all of our thermals and fleece in order–us Hawaii folk freeze in 72 degree air conditioning, lol.

      Liked by 1 person

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